Sunday, 25 October 2020

Time, Art and A White Witch

So I didn't post for three weeks or so and then four weeks. And when it got about eight weeks I started feeling that was far too long a time to be away.  And now, it's getting on for five months, and, well, I'm not sure I remember what blogging feels like any more! But of course the best way to re-start blogging is to just do it. So I won't even try to catch up with my life since my last post in May, and I'll tell you instead about a trip we took out into Surrey a few days ago. 

Surrey's a county just south of London, and parts of it still feel surprisingly rural, even though it's incredibly different to how it was 100 years ago. Or 115 years, to be precise..... because, on a visit to Hungerford, Berkshire, we visited my favourite second hand bookshop, which is in The Hungerford Arcade.  There, I picked up a book written in 1906, simply titled "SURREY."  


It has many pretty watercolour plates of Surrey as it was then. 

 
And when T. looked at the pictures there were lots of places he liked the look of, and we thought how nice it would be to go and visit them. Some, like Betchworth, (above) are recognisable today on Street View, although gardens are tidier now, and the  roads are metalled and have parked cars, instead of chickens roaming about in the dust like in 1905. And of course those picturesque cottages would have been damp and uncomfortable by modern standards... and also it seemed a bit as if we were trying to turn the clock back to 100 years ago. But still, we got in the car and off we went, glad that we weren't in 1905 for the travelling, at any rate.  

The picture that had particularly caught T's eye was of Waverley Abbey, in the valley of the River Mole....shown here as a most picturesque ruin draped in ivy, sitting in the parkland of Waverley House mansion, so the text said.

 
We knew it wouldn't be draped with creeper now - it looks wonderful but wrecks the old buildings it grows on eventually.  And there was an overall rosy aspect to the watercolours which made us suspect that the artist, Mr Sutton Palmer, might have had his rose tinted specs on. 

Waverley is still very rural, so we parked nearby and walked about ten minutes down a footpath into what was obviously part of the grounds of Waverley House, which still stood across the River Wey to our right...  

Waverley Abbey was a surprisingly large selection of ruins and fragments to our left.

 The building shown in the old watercolour is visible towards the right, and we found that it led into a large vaulted hall which mostly still survives. We found that it had lost its apex since 1905, and the right hand top window had broken still more - so that creeper had obviously done its wicked work.   

We noticed that a system of fortifications had been built at the edges of the abbey site, one of a whole chain across the South of England in anticipation of a Nazi invasion in 1941. They are now swallowed in vegetation, with the tank tank traps (below) now attractively covered in green moss, 


and a large gun emplacement now a wildlife haven but originally intended to make the whole area a battleground. 


A great big gun banging away in their direction would have been the end of the abbey ruins, for sure, but luckily, as we know, that invasion never happened.  

Founded in the 12th century, Waverley Abbey was every bit as imposing as the largest of cathedrals. However, in around 1540, the king of England decided that neither Waverley, nor any other English abbeys, were OK with him.  He didn't see why others should be controlling all that cash when he could have it. He was also sure the people of England wanted an English religion.  By happy coincidence that would also allow him to divorce his wife, who he was very fed up with, since he had his eye on another one.  

So he closed down all the abbeys, kicked out the monks (and the poor and sick who they had looked after) grabbed the money, divorced the wife and converted the country to an English religion with him at the head.  Unfortunately "Good King Hal" as King Henry VIII was known by his fans, went down in history as loveable rogue.  But he established the Church of England and changed the course of history, whether for good or bad we will never know. 

Returning to the car, we spotted a footpath sign about 100 yards down the road. It was still a couple of hours until sunset, so we decided to stroll down the path, which was heavily wooded and overlooked a river to the left and rose up to the right to a small cliff.  We soon passed a wrought iron gate set into the rocks. It led into a cave, padlocked shut.   Outside it, a small sign announced that this was Mother Ludlam's Cave.   

A sign explained that Mother Ludlam was a white witch who lived in the cave in medieval times, and helped the poor by lending them things they needed. It seemed that the poor had to return the borrowed items after two days. One day someone from Waverley Abbey borrowed a cauldron and didn't give it back.  In fact, she flew into such a rage that the thief took sanctuary in the nearest church, which apparently still has the cauldron.  A witch's cauldron is a funny sort of thing for a church to own, so I expect the story has gained a bit in the telling over hundreds of years.  I hope to visit the church and investigate next time I'm in the area - if Mr. A.R. Hope Moncrieff book is to be believed, there's plenty more to see. 

 You could see into the cave easily.  I'm sure it's changed a lot and was probably cosier in 1400, but it certainly had a handy water supply.  


The book has plenty more suggestions of what to see in Surrey so we are looking forward to exploring more.  

We've been getting out on the bike as often as possible too, but I didn't feel energetic the other day and T. took a cycle ride across the top of London through Highgate Woods, along what was once a railway line. There, he came across a man painting something very, very small on the edge of what had once been a disused railway platform. 


He didn't mind being interrupted, and was very friendly. He is called Ben Wilson and he works as an artist. One of his projects is to paint bits of discarded chewing gum. He hates litter and decided that one thing you could do with it was make art with it.  Painting chewing gum needed no gallery, permission or license, since he was not littering himself, but only improving stuff which had already been discarded. 


He was a cheerful man and told T. he began as a sculptor, but has moved more towards the miniature chewing gum paintings in recent years. It can take him a long time to create a picture. To start with, he uses a blow torch to heat the gum and then paints it with three coats of enamel, and finishes it off with lacquer.  T. didn't get a picture of the picture he was painting here, but I found an image on the internet and here it is.  


(Photograph: Ben Wilson)

Ben told T that he makes little "trails" of tiny pictures, so our next project is to seek them out now we have an idea where they are.

We've been spending a lot of this lockdown time walking around Hampstead Heath and getting to know it really well. We literally have not got bored with it at all in all these months.  The other week I spotted some bits of - well,  "found art"  I guess you'd say, in one of the more remote corners of the Heath. First I saw a Dame (Queen) of Spades and thought she must be French - she looks so glamorous.  


But then I found the Jack of Spades, and decided the cards must be German, because the Jack (or Knave) is called the Bube.  


 There was no trace of the König (King) of Spades nor of any of the other cards in the court, and it looked almost as if the virile young Jack and the pretty young Queen had eloped together. This would explain why they were so far from home, in these shadowy evening woods above London, alone beneath the swaying trees. I left them undisturbed, and I hope their story worked out well! 

I've decided to take a 5 day course at the Royal Drawing School.  The subject is Interior and Exterior Space.  I'm hoping I'll learn a bit about drawing interiors from my imagination. But the funny thing is that I'm getting more and more interested in looking at nature, particularly nature on a tiny scale. The closer you zoom into nature, the more detail you see and the more amazing beautiful and harmonious it all is.  

In my semi-lockdown walks, I've been  photographing ordinary looking bits of grassland, woodland floor, patches of wild flowers and so on.  This typical shot shows leaves, dead grass and small bracken plants. It is pretty but walking around a wood you might not even notice it underfoot.  


 I play around with the resulting images in Photoshop with the aim of forgetting about what the things in the picture actually are, and only looking at the forms and shapes and way they are put together. 

Here is the image above, rotated 90 degrees,  and converting into a negative.   


The images I get may be partly or totally abstract, but they seem to me to show the incredible complexity, energy, and movement of Nature.  I feel I can pin any ideas I want on these images. The one below seems almost violent to me, reminding me of some kind of alien creature bursting out of  a torrent or flood.   Really, it's a group of toadstools quietly growing on a log, with bits of horse chestnut case scattered about.  


The picture below was not altered at all. It's just a patch of bracken, and looks as if it was waving in the wind, except that it was standing perfectly still. 


 I am not sure I'll be as interested in the man made interiors when I start my course, but I'm looking forward to it anyway as it is something different from what I have ever done.

I have been visiting all your blogs during the last few months, though not always commenting, and will continue to do that. Thanks for being there, and hope you are enjoying your autumn! 




72 comments:

  1. Well, that's a very 'Jenny Woolf' post: interesting, informative and so much more. I'm fascinated by your new approach to art in the post. It's good, too, to see some micro-takes on places well beyond my ken.

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    1. Thank you Graham, you responded almost immediately the post went up and so I am reassured that I am obviously in your sidebar. As you suggested in your blog, it can be so hard to keep up with even favourite blogs if you are not able to follow them, and in fact after all this time, I am hoping I haven't forgotten anyone like that!

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  2. Nothing for a while then you blow us away!!
    I wonder if you ever cross paths with Steve from Shadows and Light blog with his dog Olga on the Heath?!
    A beautiful book..am I right in thinking that is one of a series?
    You are having great fun with Photoshop, getting some good images.
    Nice to know that you are still around x

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    1. Thanks, gz! Ah, I think someone else mentioned Shadows and Light. Yes, I have seen his blog and like it, but I think he is one of those who I can't follow on Blogger for some reason (see my response to Graham above). Still, I'll take another look, maybe he has added a follower widget by now.

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  3. So nice to see you here again, to walk a bit taking things in with your eyes. I wonder if you and Steve Reed, a blogger friend of mine (Shadows and Light) ever cross paths on the Heath.

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    1. Thanks! gz above just mentioned the same thing and I will check his blog out. I may well have passed him and Olga without knowing :)

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  4. Good to read you posting again
    The book is a wonderful discovery. Those old colored plates have a charm that photographs can't reproducd. Your photographs are very interesting, the toadstools especially. Happy Drawing Course!

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    1. Thank you - I did the first one today and it was very interesting. Of course I was not happy with my drawings but they were all done quite fast (I tell myself.....)!

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  5. Hello Jenny, It is interesting to take old tour books and see what is still left. In the U.S. there is a series of state guidebooks produced by the Works Progress Administration during the Depression. Sometimes one can also find stone walls or parks shelters also produced by the WPA to provide employment.
    --Jim

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    1. I like these relics of past times. Here, some big country estates have long, long walls around them, and I know that these were often put up as a way of the local landowner giving the locals a way of earning money in hard times. Not all of them were paternalistic but many were.

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  6. Thank you for the look around and for the chewing gum painting, So excellent! Another one of main reasons to absolutely love England, which i do! Living in the pacific Northwest , where history is an infant really, the oldest thing I have found was a knoll on which Lummi shucked oysters and clams. The weather here is very wet , mossy, every structure succumbs to decay rapidly. I am loving your experiments with the flora there. Clever editor. Inspiring.

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    1. The Pacific Northwest is so very beautiful! I guess pre literate history is different, but I have never forgotten a place I drove past on Vashon Island, (I think) lots of little mounds all about the same size in the forest. I think there was a sign saying it was an Indian site. But I never met anyone who had heard of it, even people who lived around there. I wish I had taken a photo but was driving at the time.

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  7. Lovely to finally see you again!! :)
    I devoured your post. ;)

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  8. Hey, Jenny - welcome back to the wonderful world of blogging. I really missed your posts. They are always interesting and informative, and I never fail to learn new things.

    Your 1906 Surrey book is a wonderful find and I love those beautiful watercolors!

    I was really intrigued by the story of Mother Ludlam, the white witch - it would be fascinating to see her cave. I'm wondering if that natural water supply was there at the time she lived in the cave.... and I think it's so amusing and ironic to know that the witch's cauldron wound up in a church!

    Your up-close photos of grasslands and woodland floors are unique and, I think, surprisingly beautiful.

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    1. Thanks, Jon! Yes, the stream always ran through the cave. It always had a name as far back as records began - Ludd's cave. Maybe it was named after her (or her husband), or she was named after it. It might have been damp living with a stream at times, but I'd guess it was pretty nice to have constant water available in those days, so much better than walking half a mile to a well!

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  9. It was so nice to see your always interesting post on my dashboard. What a wonderful idea to follow the scenes of yesteryear to and see what it looks like today. Our history in the US does not go back as far, but I live in an area where our country began. This is something that I could do and since I am a history buff, I think I might really enjoy such a project. Thank you for the idea. My only problem may be that most of the historical societies in the towns around are closed right now.

    It is lovely to have yo back on Blogger, Jenny. Many long time bloggers have left this year and I wonder if they are OK.

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    1. Thanks, Marilyn. I am glad I've suggested a project. Do the local history clubs have an online presence? I wouldn't be surprised if many folks who normally attend meetings are feeling a bit bored now and would be glad to tell you what you need to know. I too hope that people we don't see are okay. I am not quite sure why I wasn't posting, but some of it was certainly that these weird times were making other problems harder to deal and i just felt less communicative. Hopefully it won't be too long now till things are less stressful.

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  10. I live in Surrey, so welcome to my part of the world!

    I'm not sure I fancy painting on something that's been spat out of someone else's mouth, especially at the moment!

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    1. Ooh, I have to say I did not think of it like that. But yes. Yeeuch! To be fair he only chooses unsightly clumps of the stuff and prepares them very carefully to do his paintings. Part of it is the idea of covering up gunk and replacing it with something interesting and done with care.

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  11. I've read about the Chewing Gum Man. He's a well known street artist. What a fun encounter.

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    1. I had never heard of him, but it's a cool idea. And since writing the post we went to a bridge where he has done some work and see that other people have been taking it up. They don't take so much care as him, and he is more talented, but it's nice to see all the same.

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  12. How good it is to hear from you, and see some of what you've been doing. Exploring the then versus now with that book could turn into another book of its own if you wanted.

    Your photography is really fascinating. Good luck with the class, and please don't be a stranger!

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    1. Thank you ! I will try to get back to posting more now. I always admire the way you post so regularly even though your life is so busy!

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  13. I want to visit that bookshop!
    Artists do tend to put a gloss on things, the years pass and weather takes its toll, things are bnever like in the artwork.
    Lovely place to visit. Things to see and cogitate on.
    WW2 defences were in the wrong place. The only way to stop invasion is on the coast, as Hitler attempted and failed.
    Once ashore we win.
    Great to see nature up close. It is amazing how complicated small thinsg are. Their makeup looks good but the complexity behind them is amazing.
    Hampstead is a great place for that sort of investigation.

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    1. Spelling is not important....

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    2. I do recommend the bookshop. There's a whole bit upstairs which is various booksellers, this one is Unit 27 (but to be honest they are all pretty good.) It is a bit of a glory hole but all the better for it, IMO, find lots of treasures. I think you would like it, there's always a lot of history.

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  14. well come back dear Jenny

    i missed hearing from you
    i always loved your travel stories !
    Surrey looks like an exquisite place indeed
    thank you for incredibly beautiful images
    i enjoyed knowing about place and king's story was intriguing
    i also liked the story of an artist you encountered on return
    blessings!

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  15. Hello Jenny, how lovely to read another post from you! As usual, it is packed with interesting, entertaining and thought-provoking things.
    You say you don't get bored walking around where you live; same here! I was born in this town and have lived here almost all my life, and yet on my after-work walks during the months from March until now, I have come across streets I have never walked before, seen buildings and discovered parks and other public spaces I had no idea are there.

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    1. Isn't that strange the way it happens. I sometimes wonder (fancifully, not really) if there are little gnomes who move things around or insert new things into familiar places. I mentioned Hungerford in the post, and on this last visit I came across a place I had never seen in my life before in the centre of town - even though my parents lived there for decades and I was very familiar with it. I can't think of the number of times I must have walked past it!

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    2. PS: I forgot to mention in my reply that I loved the bit about the Dame and Bube cards, and the little love story you made up for them!

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  16. So good to see you back, Jenny, and I enjoyed your cracking post. We too love walking through history, and your visit to Surrey looks so enjoyable, finding the locations from the book. Everything looks like a painting, and I would love to sketch those old buildings. What a clever idea by Ben Wilson to paint those tiny pieces of public art; he is so clever. And so are you: love your close ups of nature, and what a gorgeous effect from grass and leaves. I have rarely blogged this year either, and while not really into self-analysis, I suspect it is the result of 'these strange times'. Cheers.

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    1. Thanks Patricia. I realise I am very grateful to those who DO keep blogging, it's been a lovely feeling of normality to read the familiar blogs, even though I haven't commented much on them. The feeling that life is going on in the big wide world we're not allowed to visit right now, you know...

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  17. That took me back years, as we moved to Surrey when my father left Scotland to work at what was then the War Office.Surrey is a lovely county and your visit was fascinating.

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    1. Thanks, Helen. I didn't know you had lived in Surrey. Our family home was in Wimbledon and so was T's so the non-urban bit of Surrey was pretty near. Places like Guildford have gradually been filling up with new stuff but the green belt has protected many more countrified areas and it is nice to see how much people who live there seem to cherish them.

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  18. And, you were missed, Jenny! Great to have you back once more :)

    You sure have made up for your absence. Great post...great pics.

    Take good care. :)

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    1. Thank you Lee, and thank you for your earlier message asking if I was okay. Much appreciated!

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  19. My husband worked in Carshalton years ago and I got to know parts of Surrey quite well. But I don't remember Betchworth, a town that looked beautiful back in the 1905 picture. Was it a financially comfortable town then?

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    1. Most villages were probably full of folk earning an honest living, with a minority of them actually particularly "comfortable" - but in the the case of Surrey I think its proximity to London and its generally beautiful countryside did attract wealthier and artistic people, who would have brought more money and business into Surrey villages than to equally pretty, but remote places. I think the coming of railways must have made a huge difference to Surrey too - you could live somewhere free of the smoke of London without travelling too far. The author was noticing (with disapproval) the increasing amounts of development in the bit of Surrey near to London.

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  20. Good to see you back after so long! What a fascinating picture of old Surrey, with the horses and chickens and not a car in sight! How things have changed. As you say, it's remarkable how much of Waverley Abbey has survived despite the creepers and the weather and the threat of invasion.

    Painting bits of chewing gum - the strange things people get a yen for! Those photos of nature are wonderful. They would make fabulous bits of abstract art.

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    1. Thanks, Nick. I have become so fascinated by the shapes in nature. It is particularly fascinating that they can often repeat on very different scales - a whole estuary seen from above can often appear, at first glance, little different than the fringes of a little brook!

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  21. Welcome back, Jenny! I had hoped nothing wrong with you and your family till this update of the blog. Getting motivated to go someplace by old picture book and finding how different now is so interesting. Ben Wilson is amazing. There are so many various different forms and methods of art. Painting chewing gum glued to rock or pavement is so unique and ingenious. I also like to look into the details of nature’s art like you. As for photography, I haven’t given retouch to my photos using Photoshop or the likes but I like to see the ones others did so. I constantly change the setting of my camera to capture just the way it is or in more dramatic way depending the moment and object. I’m fascinated by the changing lighting, different colors, shades and intonations each passing moment. Nice seeing you again. Have happy days ahead, and take care.

    Yoko

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    1. Thanks, Yoko, and I am glad to be back too. I am not sure I will have as much to write about as before, because I am, of course going to fewer places than I did - but on the other hand, I think I am getting more from my visits now. I always enjoy your photographs, they were one of the reasons I was so keen to visit Japan in the first place. It seems that however often we photograph nature, she is inexhaustible, always with something new and surprising even though you thought you had seen so much the previous year and the year before that!

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  22. Lovely to see you back Jenny - I love the Art Nouveau cover of the book on Surrey, but I love the fact that have shown a picture of Betchworth. Betchworth is where all of my husband's ancestors came from going back to 1198 when they were granted the right to mill on the R. Mole by William l. There is a lane, a manor, and a mill that still bears their surname today. One of his ancestors is listed in the church as rector during the 14th century.

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    1. How absolutely wonderful! Does he return there at all? I would love to have a family connection with a place that goes back that long. It shouldn't make any difference, logically, but I am sure it would. We have visited the area round Dorking quite often so may well have visited Betchworth over the years. I would probably recognise the church, if so - if we are on our bikes we usually take the chance to explore any churches we pass, and quite often in Surrey they are open. (If so I will certainly take a photos and post it here).

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    2. Yes, we have ventured there from time to time over the years - we often feel like saying to the locals "we are the ......." when we walk along the Lane that bears our surname.
      I would recommend you to visit next time that you are in the area, along with Newdigate, both are delightful little places for a visit.

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  23. Oh Jenny, I'm elated to see this post! These places are fascinating and so beautiful. And I love that you can 'get out of town' and see new things -- even if you've been there before! And it sounds as though there is so much more to discover, too. That book knocks my socks off. What a fabulous find -- I could see myself just staring at it, mouth agape with ever page turn. How fun to discover all those spots today. And then add to it Ben Wilson's unbelievable work. Boy, how he does that is beyond me but I really admire it. And love the cards too. Big smiles about the drawing class. That will be fun. And I love what you are doing with the nature photography. The "fixed up" photos are mesmerizing -- but so, too, are your "regular" pictures. Big smiles seeing this one!

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    1. Thanks so much for your nice comment, Jeanie! I heard that Ben Wilson can spend several days on painting, he gives them two coats of undercoat, and then varnishes them. It must be so hard to be lying full length on the ground painting. Lovely to see that others have been inspired by his work and quite a bit of chewing gum has been decorated on the opposite side of the bridge. I'm certainly enjoying the drawing class so far. Learning a lot, too!

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  24. Nice to know you are alive and well and able to get out a bit. Thanks for taking us along.

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    1. Thanks. These days we have to worry a bit if we don't hear from people for a while but it is good to be back.

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  25. So good to see you back, Jenny.
    I've been trying to find a signature on the paintings in your lovely book. Could they be by Helen Allingham?
    I hope you enjoy the new course.

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    1. Thanks, Judith! The paintings are by Sutton Palmer, whom I hadn't heard of before, but then I know very few watercolour artists by name. They're quite accomplished pictures, though, and I am quite envious of anyone who can sit down and do stuff like that!

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  26. A lovely post from start to finish.

    Very interesting to see and read about Ben Wilson's work ...amazing

    I do hope you enjoy your course.

    All the best Jan

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    1. thanks, Jan. Yes, I hope to meet Ben Wilson one day!

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  27. I've been to Surrey, Jenny, but haven't seen this abbey It's interesting to be inside, to hear the sounds and imagine the life that was there.
    Your view of art reminded me of Art Nouveau, the negative of your photo is amazing. Surely you will enjoy the course at the Royal School of Painting.

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    1. I am already enjoying the course, Nadezda, although it's showing how much I have to learn. But that is half the fun, they encourage, not push you. The abbey is quite out of the way, down a footpath, and you'd have to make a special effort to get there. I was still surprised not to have even heard about it before, as I thought I knew the area reasonably well.

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  28. I like the nature shots turned into abstracts.

    And you know, I've decided there are no rules about when you blog.

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    1. Yes, I guess blogs are nicest when they reflect all kinds of different approaches. I hadn't thought of that.

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  29. Discarded chewing gum as art. I love it!

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    1. And you don't need any permissions to do it. It's beautifying something that people don't want in its "natural state" !

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  30. Jenny, this was a lovely return to blogland. I'm sorry I'm late commenting, but I too haven't been quite as busy with blogging as usual. I tend to catch up with other blogs when I've posted mine so I was thrilled to see your post. What a lovely idea to explore Surry from an old book. I loved the chewing gum artist as well, and your artistic nature images are just beautiful. I hope you continue to enjoy your course. I see you say it's fun. Is it all online? Anyway, lovely to see you back here again!

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    1. Thanks Val, I will be aiming to post more regularly, ever though (in common with everyone else sensible) I'm not doing much travelling right now!

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  31. Hi Jenny, lovely to hear from you and learn a little of what you've been up to. It's been - and continues to be - an odd year, of course. I have been out of it for chunks of time, like a lot of people. I used to live in Surrey, before shifting to the frozen north, so was particularly interested to see your book. I've never seen Henry VIII, I will admit, as a loveable rogue; he was a terrifying tyrant. BUT on balance it was a good thing for England - and Britain - to break with Rome. That's not excusing the way Catholics were treated. Never heard of Mother Ludlum - need to look her up. Love Hampstead - but who doesn't? Good luck with the course!

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    1. Thanks Mike. Yes, I've always disliked Henry VIII too, but most people I know seem unaware that he was so horrible. Well, I guess it was a long time ago! I am never really sure whether breaking from Rome was a good idea but I think it helped make Britain more distinctive and itself. Why do you think it was on balance a good thing? And don't you love it that things like Mother Ludlam are still all over the place waiting to be stumbled across?

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  32. It's nice to read your new post with beautiful pictures. We live through the history and should preserve remains for future generations.

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    1. Yes, I am very keen on saving history for future generations. I wish we could learn from history

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  33. Love the toadstool pic.Hampstead Heath used to be my old stamping ground.Your post reminded me of something that has kept me going these last few months. I was about to mention it and then realized I'd mentioned it back in April: John Rogers'Youtube channel. A different preambulation around London or the countryside around it every week.

    https://sackerson.wordpress.com/

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    1. Yes, I remember your post and I had a look at John Rogers' posts - they are nice. Diamond Geezer's blog has a lot of his perambulations in East London, different bits obviously and it's not a vlog. I found another fine vlog with all kinds of interesting things about London during lockdown, but now I can't find it any more. I should have made a note! I'll post it if I do find it.

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  34. Oh, and good to see you back! It's worrying when people drop off the radar these days!

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    1. And thank you. I just noticed that you put the name of your current blog on your message, so I can find you again. Solitary-cyclist doesn't seem to have a link to Sackerson!

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